Publications: Peer-reviewed journal articles (by staff)

Acute toxicity of arsenic to larvae of four New Zealand freshwater insect taxa

1 March, 2017
CITATION

Champeau O, Cavanagh JAE, Sheehan TJ, Tremblay LA, Harding JS 2017. Acute toxicity of arsenic to larvae of four New Zealand freshwater insect taxa. New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research 51(3): 443-435.

DOI link here

ABSTRACT

Arsenic, often found in gold deposits, can enter aquatic systems. The toxicity of arsenate (As(V)), the most common valence state of arsenic in freshwater, was assessed on the larvae of four freshwater insect taxa from naturally acidic (pH 5.9) and circumneutral (pH 7.4) New Zealand streams. Insects from the acidic stream were more sensitive to arsenate-spiked water than those from the circumneutral stream. Early instars (<3 mm) of the mayfly Deleatidium spp. (Leptophlebiidae) were the most sensitive compared to later instars (3–6 mm) (4-d LC50 1.5 and 3.5 mg/L, respectively) or to the stonefly Zelandobius spp. (Gripopterygidae) (4-d LC502.5 mg/L). The cased caddisflies Pycnocentria spp. (Conoesucidae) and Helicopsyche spp. (Helicopsychidae) from circumneutral stream were the most tolerant (4-d LC50 45.4 and 113 mg/L, respectively). The 14-day arsenic LC10 and LC50 for Deleatidium spp. late instars exposed to mining-impacted water were 0.12 and 0.36 mg/L, respectively.