Publications: Peer-reviewed journal articles (by staff)

A new, subalpine species of Daphnia (Cladocera, Anomopoda) in the D. carinata species complex, in the South Island, New Zealand

  • Burns CW, Duggan IC,
  • Banks JC,
  • and Hogg ID
1 September, 2017
CITATION

Burns CW, Duggan IC, Banks JC, Hogg ID 2017. A new, subalpine species of Daphnia (Cladocera, Anomopoda) in the D. carinata species complex, in the South Island, New Zealand. Hydrobiologia 798(1): 151-169.

DOI link here

ABSTRACT

Until recently, only one native and three apparently introduced Daphnia species were known from New Zealand. We demonstrate that (1) Daphnia in subalpine habitats in southern New Zealand differ morphologically and genetically from the native taxon previously labelled Daphnia carinata to merit species nova status and (2) the name of the latter should revert to D. thomsoni, used by Sars (1894) for Daphnia described from New Zealand mud. We compare some key characteristics and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) sequences of the New Zealand native and other morphologically similar species. Distinctive characteristics of subalpine populations, described as Daphnia tewaipounamu sp. nov., are a wide cephalic shield with lateral flanges curving dorsally via rounded fornices, dorsal cervical depression variably expressed as a ‘step’ in the cephalic shield exuviae and retention of ephippia within shed carapace exoskeletons long after ecdysis. CO1 sequences revealed that D. tewaipounamu sp. nov. belongs to the D. carinata complex but is highly divergent (>14%) from other known members of this complex. New Zealand D. thomsoni is divergent (>15%) from D. carinata s.s. However, it is not endemic to New Zealand, as we confirmed its presence in Tasmania, and some Australian populations are closely related to it.